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my own dilema with making a website., i really need some guidance on this.
creole
post May 27 2010, 12:35 AM
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Okay. I'm inspired from sites like 99mockingbirds, outspoken-kate, and swimchick. I like their designs, their website layout, their neatness, and most importantly their generous contribution to the world of graphic designing. They also have personal blogs which I love to read.

The thing is..what can a newbie like me start on a path like this? My intentions of my website would be blogging, frequent graphic designing related posts, and a personal portfolio for photography and digital art. Many of cB members that I know already have sites like the one I want, but it would be really helpful if someone gave me the ropes. Most of these questions can be searched, but I want the members of cB's personal first experience or advice with their website. What hosting is reliable and worth the bang for the buck. (I'd like to know you guys buying policies and how much memory you use or bandwidth, like say, should a beginner like me go all out and buy the highest value of hosting there is?) Does it matter what type of domain I purchase? Should I use .com or .net? What are some good leads to get into web design besides classes, because I have no intentions of wasting an elective in high school. (Trying not to sound ignorant, but my scholarship program wants me to take rigorous academic classes instead) What are the benefits of having a website? How would I get more hits? Please vent out all your info here.


Oh and money isn't an issue for me..but the pricing should be somewhat reasonable.
 
creole
post Jun 3 2010, 03:24 PM
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bump, because i really need the help.
 
randycowell
post Jun 9 2010, 07:26 AM
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Having an open links to other websites in a new window is a great idea. That way your visitors can easily return to your site when they are finished browsing the external link
 
creole
post Jun 9 2010, 10:18 AM
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thank you. at least someone cares to post in this topic.
 
Mikeplyts
post Jun 9 2010, 11:20 AM
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^ Wow.

Anyhow, I'd say you should get a nice, cheap host. There are a lot of cheap hosts that give unlimited bandwith and shit like that, which you'll probably want if you're planning on having a blog, graphics, resources, etc. I can't really decide for you which hosting you should go with, but that should give you an idea. And yeah, a beginner like yourself shouldn't go with the most hi-tech, expensive host there is. And even more so, you can have just the same quality and equally big website with an "alright" host compared to a "super" host. The domain extensions usually don't matter, but the most common extension is .com. Sometimes, the .com isn't available for the domain name you want, so you could just use another extension (usually there's a .net available or something). Like, when I was registering my domain, mikeplyts.com was already taken (f*cking advertising sites) so I had to go with mikeplyts.net. Not much of a difference, though, because what really matters is the content.

And speaking of content, you should be organized and try to be as user-friendly as possible. And if you can, try to be user-dynamic too (you know, like neat little Javascript effects and/or clean Flash objects). Also, make sure that you have a well constructed setup that'd be easy to follow (like where everything is positioned, how big/wide an area compared to another one, where you want the most attention, how you want your users' eyes to follow through your website with a breeze, and the like).

As for web design classes, just search online. To learn the basics, you should go to a site like W3 Schools. To get a bit more advanced, try sites like Net Tuts+. There's a ton of sites out there that provide some useful methods and techniques for web design. If you're having trouble with any codes and stuff, you can always try looking it up on Google or something or you can just post here on cB if you need help and usually there will be peeps willing to help you out and give further advice (like me, or Michael (mipadi), Elia (fixtatik), or even that new Randy guy).

Let's see, the benefits of a website are pretty much already set out in front of you. You can have your own blog to write about whatever you want whenever, display content where you want and how you want, make your own layout completely up to how you want it (no templates or anything like that you'd have to go by), and basically, just express your imagination however you'd like (within web standards of course, and if you have enough skills to do so). And as for hits, just make sure you have a kick-ass site and try to get known. You can do this by affiliating with other websites, making link exchanges, getting advertised, putting copyrights/watermarks on your work to show it's yours, place links and credits on your work too, don't jock anything, have a user-friendly setup with decent (or awesome, however you want) content, and be the best you can be at handling things on your site whether they be good or bad.

There's a tonnage of more information I could give and even more that others could give. Just do what you gotta do, bro.

P.S. - Now do I care about this topic? >:|
 
creole
post Jun 9 2010, 11:23 AM
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yes. <3, and thank u mike for the plethora of info.
 
Mikeplyts
post Jun 9 2010, 11:27 AM
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Yeah, yeah. Don't mention it.
 
creole
post Jun 9 2010, 10:17 PM
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kekekekek
 
99mockingbirds
post Jul 17 2010, 10:06 AM
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The benefits of having a website, allows one to get experiences in the world of web design and access among many people and get s share of their's.

Getting a website is easy, but putting up with it takes hard work. You need to have inspiration and motivation.

As a start of, I'd want a free web host, and buying a domain for about $10 bucks.
I like .com, because it is most used and popular, and to person, .com comes in mind then .net or .org
 
ForgiveTheSinner
post Jul 19 2010, 04:03 AM
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^what Tuly said.

One thing that bothers me (and I was guilty for) is updating the site. Since I started over with a portfolio/blog it doesn't matter how long between posts since the site is mainly for myself to build up. If you want to open a graphic/resource kind of site with a blog and portfolio on the side, I suggest that you update regularly and not disappear. I know it's hard to keep up with school and all but if we open a site a neglect it then what is the point in the first place?

As for good leads into web design, the only thing I can think of are tutorials. I learned all I know now from google search :D

Good luck.
 
creole
post Jul 19 2010, 08:58 AM
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QUOTE(99mockingbirds @ Jul 17 2010, 07:06 AM) *
The benefits of having a website, allows one to get experiences in the world of web design and access among many people and get s share of their's.

Getting a website is easy, but putting up with it takes hard work. You need to have inspiration and motivation.

As a start of, I'd want a free web host, and buying a domain for about $10 bucks.
I like .com, because it is most used and popular, and to person, .com comes in mind then .net or .org


Thank you so much. it's actually an honor having you reply in my thread. your designs are absolutely jaw dropping. :)


QUOTE(ForgiveTheSinner @ Jul 19 2010, 01:03 AM) *
^what Tuly said.

One thing that bothers me (and I was guilty for) is updating the site. Since I started over with a portfolio/blog it doesn't matter how long between posts since the site is mainly for myself to build up. If you want to open a graphic/resource kind of site with a blog and portfolio on the side, I suggest that you update regularly and not disappear. I know it's hard to keep up with school and all but if we open a site a neglect it then what is the point in the first place?

As for good leads into web design, the only thing I can think of are tutorials. I learned all I know now from google search :D

Good luck.


That's so true! Dead sites are kinda sad to see. and thank you also for the wonderful tips :)
 
butre
post Jul 19 2010, 09:53 AM
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if you want a great host, check out brohoster. shit's cheap and high-quality.
 
venti-anemoi
post Jul 20 2010, 08:34 PM
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QUOTE(ForgiveTheSinner @ Jul 19 2010, 02:03 AM) *
One thing that bothers me (and I was guilty for) is updating the site. Since I started over with a portfolio/blog it doesn't matter how long between posts since the site is mainly for myself to build up. If you want to open a graphic/resource kind of site with a blog and portfolio on the side, I suggest that you update regularly and not disappear. I know it's hard to keep up with school and all but if we open a site a neglect it then what is the point in the first place?


Personally, I think this was probably my biggest downfall when it came to my graphics/resource site, and the biggest downfall of any graphics/resource site. You have to be willing to commit a lot to this site. I know I won't visit sites regularly unless they update often, so why should other webmasters be any different?

If you're really just starting out and want to get a feel of what it'll be like, may I suggest subdomain hosting? There are plenty of people out there who have more space than they use and are willing to give you a subdomain for free. I really wanted to get my own domain, but a) I had no money (still don't) and b) I wasn't sure if I would be able to stick through with it, so I went with a subdomain. Of course, that opens a whole new can of worms (I've had to deal with bad hosts who don't give a sh*t about you or your site), but I think it's worth it for the experience.

(But if you're set on it then I would say go ahead with the domain. + free host)
 
creole
post Jul 20 2010, 09:03 PM
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QUOTE(ButtsexV2 @ Jul 19 2010, 06:53 AM) *
if you want a great host, check out brohoster. shit's cheap and high-quality.


thank you, i'll look into that.

QUOTE(venti-anemoi @ Jul 20 2010, 05:34 PM) *
Personally, I think this was probably my biggest downfall when it came to my graphics/resource site, and the biggest downfall of any graphics/resource site. You have to be willing to commit a lot to this site. I know I won't visit sites regularly unless they update often, so why should other webmasters be any different?

If you're really just starting out and want to get a feel of what it'll be like, may I suggest subdomain hosting? There are plenty of people out there who have more space than they use and are willing to give you a subdomain for free. I really wanted to get my own domain, but a) I had no money (still don't) and b) I wasn't sure if I would be able to stick through with it, so I went with a subdomain. Of course, that opens a whole new can of worms (I've had to deal with bad hosts who don't give a sh*t about you or your site), but I think it's worth it for the experience.

(But if you're set on it then I would say go ahead with the domain. + free host)


that sounds like a great idea. how would i approach someone if they wanted to subdomain host though?
 
venti-anemoi
post Jul 20 2010, 10:09 PM
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Invisus Designs has an article on how to find a good host here.

If you know any webmasters with their own domains, you could email them explaining what you want your site to be and asking if they're willing to host you or give you a subdomian. Look for people who are already hosting a few sites (not a lot, though) - that's a good indication that they're open to hosting / are good hosts. Some may ask for samples of your work, if you're planning a graphics/resource site, which is normal, and a good chance to show off. :)

Also, look for sites that are similar to the one you're planning on opening - if you want to open a graphics site that features mainly anime, for example, then try asking webmasters of other anime graphics sites.

You may have to get the subdomain and the hosting separately. Some hosts will give you a url (yoursite.theirsite.com or theirsite.com/yoursite) but not enough space, especially for a graphics site; you may have to find a sponsor who will provide the extra space you need. Try to find a host who will give you both a url and sufficient space, but be open-minded if you can't find what you want.

Personally, I would first look at sites whose owners you know and/or you visit often. Take a look at their hosts if they're being hosted by someone else. You could ask people you know to refer you to their host too. Try to get your name and your work out there, and you'll find a good host in no time.

Good luck! :)
 
Firiath
post Jul 26 2010, 11:12 AM
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http://bubble.nu seems like a pretty good host :]
I emailed the host once and got a reply back within 24hours
Plus there's a forum where you can talk to the hoster and her hostees
 
goneagain
post Jul 30 2010, 09:21 PM
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First: Don't believe in host's with 'unlimited bandwidth..etc"
It's not true. Usually in there terms it'll say otherwise.
Like Unlimited to a certain point.

If you really want to learn HTML and CSS. Classes can be good, you could say that on your portfolio if you try to find clients to do websites, like the kind of college you went to. I started out with a eBook a friend gave to me. If you're really dedicated on learning how to code, read W3Schools Then PM me ill be glad to give you the eBooks I used that taught me a lot.

Don't buy anything until you know how to create a website, on less it's a domain and you think someone might take it. and .com is the best, but .net is cool too :)

So do you want to be a Graphix artist? Or a Illustrator? Take lots and lots and lots on tutorials!


 
creole
post Aug 1 2010, 05:05 AM
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QUOTE(venti-anemoi @ Jul 20 2010, 07:09 PM) *
Invisus Designs has an article on how to find a good host here.

If you know any webmasters with their own domains, you could email them explaining what you want your site to be and asking if they're willing to host you or give you a subdomian. Look for people who are already hosting a few sites (not a lot, though) - that's a good indication that they're open to hosting / are good hosts. Some may ask for samples of your work, if you're planning a graphics/resource site, which is normal, and a good chance to show off. :)

Also, look for sites that are similar to the one you're planning on opening - if you want to open a graphics site that features mainly anime, for example, then try asking webmasters of other anime graphics sites.

You may have to get the subdomain and the hosting separately. Some hosts will give you a url (yoursite.theirsite.com or theirsite.com/yoursite) but not enough space, especially for a graphics site; you may have to find a sponsor who will provide the extra space you need. Try to find a host who will give you both a url and sufficient space, but be open-minded if you can't find what you want.

Personally, I would first look at sites whose owners you know and/or you visit often. Take a look at their hosts if they're being hosted by someone else. You could ask people you know to refer you to their host too. Try to get your name and your work out there, and you'll find a good host in no time.

Good luck! :)



Thank you again and I'll definitely go with your plan!

QUOTE(Firiath @ Jul 26 2010, 08:12 AM) *
http://bubble.nu seems like a pretty good host :]
I emailed the host once and got a reply back within 24hours
Plus there's a forum where you can talk to the hoster and her hostees


Thanks for the suggestion. =)


QUOTE(kawohi @ Jul 30 2010, 06:21 PM) *
First: Don't believe in host's with 'unlimited bandwidth..etc"
It's not true. Usually in there terms it'll say otherwise.
Like Unlimited to a certain point.

If you really want to learn HTML and CSS. Classes can be good, you could say that on your portfolio if you try to find clients to do websites, like the kind of college you went to. I started out with a eBook a friend gave to me. If you're really dedicated on learning how to code, read W3Schools Then PM me ill be glad to give you the eBooks I used that taught me a lot.

Don't buy anything until you know how to create a website, on less it's a domain and you think someone might take it. and .com is the best, but .net is cool too :)

So do you want to be a Graphix artist? Or a Illustrator? Take lots and lots and lots on tutorials!


Hmm that is a lot to learn. I want to be a Graphics artist. My school has a class that teaches Websites coding with like Dreamweaver so does that count as part of HTML and CSS?
 
synapse
post Aug 1 2010, 08:25 AM
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QUOTE(Cum @ Aug 1 2010, 06:05 AM) *
Thank you again and I'll definitely go with your plan!
Thanks for the suggestion. =)
Hmm that is a lot to learn. I want to be a Graphics artist. My school has a class that teaches Websites coding with like Dreamweaver so does that count as part of HTML and CSS?

A class that teaches website coding in a first level course, will probably teach you just HTML. A good book for HTML is Head First HTML It's kinda corny, but everything you need to know is there. But coding "with" dreamweaver isn't teaching you how to code, it's teaching you how to use dreamweaver, and to use dreamweaver you have to know some html. CSS is everything like styling for myspace websites. HTML is just formatting.
 
creole
post Aug 1 2010, 02:48 PM
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Wowzers, thanks. I'm going to Barnes & Nobles this week, so would you recommend the one that teachers CSS & XHTML also?
 
venti-anemoi
post Aug 2 2010, 11:57 PM
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QUOTE(synapse @ Aug 1 2010, 06:25 AM) *
A good book for HTML is Head First HTML It's kinda corny, but everything you need to know is there.


LOL my java class has Head First Java as a required textbook. I'm in college, btw. XD "Corny" is a good word to describe that series, I think. Still, it's a lot more interesting than the other assigned readings, and I get more out of it.

QUOTE
Wowzers, thanks. I'm going to Barnes & Nobles this week, so would you recommend the one that teachers CSS & XHTML also?


Tbh I don't think you absolutely need to buy any books just to learn HTML and CSS. I learned everything about web languages on the web, by reading a ton of tutorials *cough* and making all my mistakes in Xanga *cough*. The downside to that is that I was never entirely sure if my code was "correct," but hey -- it worked. :D The W3schools are a good place to start. If you're confused after reading tutorials, then maybe you could invest in a book.

(But just so you know, I'm an extremely frugal [read: cheap] person and hate spending money unless absolutely necessary, so.... if you feel the urge to splurge, then go for it. ^_^ )
 
goneagain
post Aug 3 2010, 03:48 AM
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Please don't use Dreamweaver. It stops you from learning how to code from scratch. Plus it just takes over ram.

Try e-text editor.
 
Butterface89
post Sep 26 2010, 03:47 PM
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QUOTE(Cum @ Jul 19 2010, 08:58 AM) *
Thank you so much. it's actually an honor having you reply in my thread. your designs are absolutely jaw dropping. :)
That's so true! Dead sites are kinda sad to see. and thank you also for the wonderful tips :)



Beanz? This might sound silly but you may want to consider hiring at least one person to keep updating and researching/whatever while you take time to study and do other things that need to be done. You said you were taking some classes. I'm no master of this but having a site can wear you DOWN. Especially if it takes off and you've got thousands of people emailing, sending messages, asking questions. Okay, that's an exaggeration:D Even if you've got, say 1000 people, that can still mean a good 40-50 people contacting you about something per day,ect.

If you get someone to work the mail and assist people with whatever they may need, you can focus on another aspect of the business. And yes, it 'is' a business.

You can even have some college students "intern" for your website in exchange for college credit if you need to do that. Your business would apply to the college you choose and then they will verify that you are legit, ect. You can pay them, offer a 'stipend', or have them work solely for credit.

Just my 2 cents:D
 

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